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Carbon Steel Care 101

Carbon Steel
Care 101

Congrats on your new carbon steel pan!

This pan has seen a lot of use in professional kitchens, and is just recently getting into the hands of home cooks everywhere. Please note: the insert that arrived with your pan may be out of date. This page has the most up-to-date instructions on how to prepare and care for your pan.

Your pan arrives coated in beeswax to protect it. It’s easy to scrub off:

  1. Place your pan in an empty sink and run very hot water over it, including the bottom.
  2. Using a non-metallic brush or scrubber, scrub away the protective wax under the running hot water. Make sure to clean the bottom of the pan well.
  3. Dry the pan thoroughly, and follow instructions for “Seasoning your pan” below.

What is “seasoning?” Microscopic layers of fats that make your pan nonstick.

These layers get baked into the metal of your pan to keep food from sticking, and protect your pan from moisture. As your pan’s seasoning develops over time, it’ll become darker — that’s good! These colored layers of fats are called a “patina.”

What is “seasoning?” Microscopic layers of fats that make your pan nonstick.

These layers get baked into the metal of your pan to keep food from sticking, and protect your pan from moisture. As your pan’s seasoning develops over time, it’ll become darker — that’s good! These colored layers of fats are called a “patina.”

Seasoning Your Pan for the First Time

To season your pan, you'll need your choice of seasoning wax, or a high smoke point cooking oil like soybean, corn, sunflower, vegetable or canola oil. DO NOT use olive oil, butter or bacon. Also grab a few paper towels.

  1. Place your pan on a stovetop, and apply 4-5 drops of oil (or ¼ tsp of wax).
  2. Rub it around with a paper towel to distribute, until there is no visible oil remaining.
  3. Heat the pan on high heat until the oil or wax starts smoking. Lower heat to medium.
  4. You will begin to see oil or wax pooling — use a paper towel to rub it back into the pan until gone.
  5. Allow your pan to continue smoking for a few moments. Rub away collecting oil or wax intermittently.
  6. Remove from heat, and wipe away any visible oil or wax.
  7. Allow your pan to cool, and repeat this seasoning process 3-4 more times, until it starts to gain some color.

Important! Keep a close watch on your pan as it heats up and smokes. Rub in and wipe away any excess oil or wax that begins to collect.

Seasoning Tips:

1. Your seasoning may appear uneven or a little blotchy at first. That’s fine! Every carbon steel pan has a unique look, and it’s patina will change gradually over time. Think of it as a “living” object.

2. How your pan’s seasoning looks is less important than how it feels. It might appear darker in spots, or uneven, but that is natural and will change with time. Stickiness or roughness are signs that you might need to scrub your pan a bit and reseason it.

3. Carbon steel is less porous than cast iron, so it requires very little oil or seasoning wax. Remember to wipe away the excess until the pan shows a dry sheen.

Cooking with your pan the first few times:

When you first start cooking with your newly-seasoned pan, you will still need a little cooking fat, like you would with a normal pan. Over time, the pan will build up a more natural nonstick surface as you expose it to fats and oils, and it’ll gain the inherent non-stickiness you’re looking for. Don’t be discouraged!

As you cook with your pan and clean it, it will develop its colored patina. Every patina is different, and it will change over time. This is one of the special things about carbon steel pans — they’re each unique. The important thing to remember is that how the patina looks is less important than how it feels to the touch.

Seasoning your pan for the first time:

To season your pan, you'll need your choice of seasoning wax, or a high smoke point cooking oil like soybean, corn, sunflower, vegetable or canola oil. DO NOT use olive oil, butter or bacon. Also grab a few paper towels.

  1. Place your pan on a stovetop, and apply 4-5 drops of oil (or ¼ tsp of wax).
  2. Rub it around with a paper towel to distribute, until there is no visible oil remaining.
  3. Heat the pan on high heat until the oil or wax starts smoking. Lower heat to medium.
  4. You will begin to see oil or wax pooling — use a paper towel to rub it back into the pan until gone.
  5. Allow your pan to continue smoking for a few moments. Rub away collecting oil or wax intermittently.
  6. Remove from heat, and wipe away any visible oil or wax.
  7. Allow your pan to cool, and repeat this seasoning process 3-4 more times, until it starts to gain some color.

Important! Keep a close watch on your pan as it heats up and smokes. Rub in and wipe away any excess oil or wax that begins to collect.

Seasoning Tips:

1. Your seasoning may appear uneven or a little blotchy at first. That’s fine! Every carbon steel pan has a unique look, and it’s patina will change gradually over time. Think of it as a “living” object.

2. How your pan’s seasoning looks is less important than how it feels. It might appear darker in spots, or uneven, but that is natural and will change with time. Stickiness or roughness are signs that you might need to scrub your pan a bit and reseason it.

3. Carbon steel is less porous than cast iron, so it requires very little oil or seasoning wax. Remember to wipe away the excess until the pan shows a dry sheen.

Cooking with your pan the first few times:

When you first start cooking with your newly-seasoned pan, you will still need a little cooking fat, like you would with a normal pan. Over time, the pan will build up a more natural nonstick surface as you expose it to fats and oils, and it’ll gain the inherent non-stickiness you’re looking for. Don’t be discouraged!

As you cook with your pan and clean it, it will develop its colored patina. Every patina is different, and it will change over time. This is one of the special things about carbon steel pans — they’re each unique. The important thing to remember is that how the patina looks is less important than how it feels to the touch.

Everyday Care for Carbon Steel

Don't Wash With Soap

If a quick wipe doesn’t clean your pan, wash with a little water and a non-abrasive scrubber. Dish soap and abrasive tools will strip the seasoning.

Do Not Put in Dishwasher

It’ll strip your seasoning layers, and you’ll have to start seasoning your pan again from scratch.

Dry Well

Make sure your pan is completely dry before you put it away. Heating it for a few minutes on your stovetop will remove any remaining moisture.

Keep It Protected

If you used water to clean your pan, add a little more seasoning agent to the warmed pan after fully drying. Rub it into the cooking surface, wipe off excess (like you did when first seasoning), and store.

Questions about Caring for Carbon Steel?

Contact us anytime at hello@misen.com

Everyday Care for Carbon Steel

 

Don't Wash With Soap

If a quick wipe doesn’t clean your pan, wash with a little water and a non-abrasive scrubber. Dish soap and abrasive tools will strip the seasoning.

Do Not Put in Dishwasher

It’ll strip your seasoning layers, and you’ll have to start seasoning your pan again from scratch.

Dry Well

Make sure your pan is completely dry before you put it away. Heating it for a few minutes on your stovetop will remove any remaining moisture.

Keep It Protected

If you used water to clean your pan, add a little more seasoning agent to the warmed pan after fully drying. Rub it into the cooking surface, wipe off excess (like you did when first seasoning), and store.

Questions about Caring for Carbon Steel?

Contact us anytime at hello@misen.com